My PhD Acknowledgements <3

Four point five years. Summarised in 131 pages and 18 scientific publications. That and a new title.

While the new title does sound cool (how else can one be taken seriously when announcing world domination), the biggest result is the little book: the dissertation, in my case, on Learning Dashboards. But while I hope the pages reach the intended audience (the Learning Analytics community), I wonder if anyone beyond that will read it.

Probably not. And that’s fine.

But more than just research and writing went into this achievement. A lot of people, friends, family, and colleagues, were part of the process. Pulling and pushing me along the path that led me here. So even if the main contribution doesn’t reach a large audience, I hope the acknowledgements in my book do. Without these people, I would not be where I am today, nor would this small advancement in Learning Analytics research.

So I could be ignorant and assume you’ll download and read the book ;) But I’ll just leave you with the first few pages, the important ones about.. the important ones.

Here we go…

Twenty years ago, I figured, let’s do Physics. I loved all things space and dinosaur related, and had an awesome Physics teacher. However, that same teacher told me studying Physics would most likely land me in Finance. So, I followed my other passion, Computer Science.

 

But after completing my degree and spending years in the private sector, I wondered if I had made the right decision. While I had a passion for programming, the lack of creativity that comes with a software engineering job (beyond the code) was killing me. Moving to Nottingham to pursue a career in games did not improve the situation either: a developer just develops, it seems. Side projects (indie game development and art academy) were an attempt to bring some creativity back into my life, but I needed a serious change where I spent most of my time: the day job.

 

The PhD was an unexpected opportunity that presented itself in my mailbox. Two weeks it sat there until I finally decided to reply. What followed was life changing. Research meant I could explore the unknown, build things no one had before, and join the user in their experience with our new creations. I got paid to create visualisations, play with new technology, and spend time thinking of all the crazy things we could accomplish with it. Both the nerd and the artist in me were satisfied. This might just be where I belong. It only took me 36 years to figure it out…

 

Thirty-six years is a long time. I owe where I am today to a lot of amazing people: for the opportunities, the support, the patience, and the listening.

 

I would like to thank Erik. In 2013, I somehow convinced him I would be the right guy for the job. When times got tough, he would keep convincing me I was. “I wasn’t that smart either and look where I am now”, a pep talk I will never forget. From all the “bosses” I’ve had, he was one of the few who genuinely cared about his people, at a personal, family, and career level. Thanks for letting me get to know you and your amazing family. Your awesome ideas will live on in our work, we will all make sure of that.

 

If it wasn’t for Bert, I would have never even considered a PhD. But it was his better half, Katrien, who got me in the room with Erik. I owe a lot to her. She stepped in just as I was close to jumping ship. She was the motivating force I needed, and pushed me across the finish line. Thanks to both Katrien and Tinne, this last year and a half of the PhD has been amazing. We’ve published great papers, made a name in the community, and put our stamp on student advice at the university.

 

Joris. What was it Jose said, thanks for the coffee? I’ll do one better: bourbon at Harvard, such an amazing trip! He never once doubted me, and I will never forget his endless “het komt goed” (it will be all right). And who’d have thought, it did! (I guess this calls for another round of drinks in Boston!).

 

I would also like to thank Andrew, Bieke, Yolande, and Martin, for taking the time to read my dissertation, providing valuable feedback, and a memorable private defence.

 

But my biggest thanks goes to Elke. I could not have achieved this without the love of my life (15 years this year, 10 as my gorgeous wife). Always supporting my crazy decisions. She quit a promising career to follow me abroad and let me pursue my game developer dream back in 2008. And in 2013 she supported me again in my biggest career change, when I gave up a well-paid, secure job to become a student once again. We were not expecting the PhD to be such a roller-coaster. I experienced moments of joy and despair, feelings that would affect her as much as it did me. But she always had my back, endured the after-work rants, and supported me in every way possible. Without her, I would never have managed.

 

Hazel joined us (in the womb) at the start of the PhD. Kids do not make things easier. But they do give you a reason to keep going. During dark periods of the PhD, she was always there to put a smile on my face (or add to the misery with sleepless nights. She’s a little monster like that). Hazel, if you read this when you are older, we love you and we will make sure you get to follow your dreams just as we could.

 

My parents, Marinette and Guy: they have always been there for me, supported me, and believed in me (and also provided me with all the nerdy hardware a kid needs to keep his technology interest going). And my grandparents, Meke, Vake, Peter Wieke, and Bobonne. Meke is not here to see this, but if someone believed I could pull this off, it was her.

 

My parents-in-law, Monique and Daniel, and the “Moekes”, for treating me like one of their own. Monique, the things you have missed out on, it is not fair. We miss you, words cannot describe.

 

Kurt, thanks for showing up at the defence (if you didn’t, this is going to be awkward). You’ve been that one true best friend. Always there in time of needs. And always making me look good at the board game table.

 

Franky, the bastard who pulled me out of the Flemish, secure mindset, and lured me to England. I ended up working long unpaid hours in Nottingham and lived amongst criminals and drunks. But I regret nothing!

 

José, for his unique perspectives on things, telling it like it is, and your attempt at keeping me sane through the PhD (it did not work).

 

Thomas for the babysitting and being Hazel’s coolest uncle. And “Tantan”, for taking care of Hazel all those Mondays, and for all the things you have done for Elke.

 

Kris, for bringing that new addiction into my life. The Nets won’t run themselves! Lies, for being Hazel’s awesome godmother. Jim, thanks for letting me win sometimes. Wait, no.

 

Sean, Jenna, Greg, and Johnny. One day Rad Lab Games will rise again!

 

François and Denis, we will make that dinner happen and bathe in Brasschaat’s sushi! Until then we will just shoot people online.

 

NorthgateArinso: Fred, Schtroumpf, Maarten, Karo, and Tom. My first and fourth job (thanks Samir), and also my last job before I ran off to academia (I am not implying anything!).

 

Everyone at Monumental Games and iChoosr, even though the stops were short, they were life changing.

 

My current, former, and visiting colleagues at the coolest lab of the Computer Science department: Yucheng, Karsten, Francisco, Gonzalo, Robin, Tom, Sam, Bruno, Victor, Gayane, Chen, Sten, Till, Frans, Samara, and Oana. And all the amazing people of the weSPOT, eCloud, and ABLE projects.

 

The Blade Runner soundtrack, for getting me through numerous paper deadlines.

 

And Bert. For getting me into this mess in the first place.

 

Dude, sucking at something is the first step towards being sorta good at something.

– Jake the Dog, Adventure Time

I love you, Pumpkin.

– Honey Bunny, Pulp Fiction


Also published on Medium.

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